Natural Attraction

Halona Blowhole

Molten Lava Tube Sprays Water 30 Feet in the Air

Hawaii offers a plethora of natural wonders and spectacular visitor attractions, but a must-see when visiting the islands is the Halona Blowhole on Oahu. The blowhole is a natural occurrence formed by molten lava tubes from volcanic eruptions thousands of years ago. The lava tubes run to the ocean and, when the surf is right, the blowhole shoots water up to 30 feet in the air. The larger the waves, the larger the spray.

Situated to the right of the Halona Blowhole is the Halona Beach Cove, also known at the “Peering Place.” This small sandy beach at the cove is great for swimming when the surf is calm. The site is known for the famous love scene between Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr in the movie, From Here to Eternity (1953). If you’re lucky, you can see the resident honu (endangered Hawaiian green sea turtle).

Halona Blowhole

The blowhole is a natural occurrence formed by molten lava tubes from volcanic eruptions thousands of years ago

Below Halona is the Ka Iwi channel, one of the most dangerous, unpredictable ocean channels in the world. There are no lifeguards at the Halona sites, so be extremely careful, and do not swim when the surf is rough. Wear sturdy shoes and use extreme caution, as the walk down to the beach is steep and rocky. Be cautious of your surroundings when in the water. The waves crash against the sides of the narrow bay, producing very powerful waves. Do not go near the blowhole. The lookout is the safest spot where you can view the site.

Halona Blowhole is just a 10-15 minute drive from Waikiki and is a spectacular scenic stroll. Located off the Kalanianole Highway and north of Hanauma Bay, the lookout at Halona Blowhole is worth the stop. The lookout offers an excellent view of the coastline and outer islands, such as Molokai and Lanai, on clear days. During the winter months, the lookout is a great spot to watch whales at play.

Access

© 1997-2011 Aloha from Hawaii