Honolulu Hale—City Hall

Description

Honolulu Hale opened in downtown Honolulu in 1927 featuring pillars and arches, ceiling frescoes, decorative balconies and a tiled roof. The building was designed by the renowned architect of the time Charles William Dickey. Modeled after the Bargello Palace built in Italy in the 13th century, Honolulu Hale has an open-air courtyard at the center where musical performances often take place, while the building’s expansive lobby often features art exhibits.

Honolulu Hale City Hall

Honolulu Hale was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978

Another interesting architectural feature at Honolulu Hale is the grand double staircase that leads from the back of the courtyard up to a wrap-around mezzanine. Italianate work on the building was done by Italian sculptor Mario Valdastri. Also notable is the large bell just inside the front door of Honolulu Hale. The bell came from the World War II ship U.S.S. Honolulu which was commissioned in 1938. Honolulu Hale was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. A small memorial in front of Honolulu Hale includes a plaque and an “eternal flame” that remains lit in honor of the victims of the World Trade Center attacks on September 11, 2001.

Access

Honolulu Hale is located on South King and Punchbowl Streets in downtown Honolulu.

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